Archive | My journey to hijaab RSS feed for this section

One Year Into It, Finally Convinced?

7 Nov

“I’m not convinced with hijab one hundred percent” is what I thought throughout the last 10 months that I have worn hijab.  It didn’t make sense to me to do something Allah (swt) had ordered in the Quran without completely understanding it. In fact, 4 months into wearing the hijab consistently, not even looking out the window without it, I wanted to take it off completely. I wanted to know what made one who wore a scarf different than one who does not if they both dress the same, pray five times a day, fast and obey Allah. I wanted to know why people are quicker to judge a female who wears hijab rather than one who does not, and then vice versa. I’m not a scholar, and I’m definitely not one to want to debate about a topic like this. I just wanted answers, especially being the only one in my high school who wears the hijab, the only one to get asked questions that I wish I could answer. Answer more than “it is part of my religion”. When I wanted to take off the hijab, I didn’t. I thought about how it would be to walk outside without it after wearing it, and I tried it, yet ran back inside my house because something rushed over me. I walked back inside and decided to renew my intentions, I did dhikr, (remembrance of Allah) and I prayed. I told one of my non-Muslim friends what I thought and she told me “If I were you, I would keep it on, forget what people think because that is what you are thinking about, people. You should be thinking about doing it for God, because He asked you to. Keep the hijab on. It became a part of you. Would you let go of something you’ve known every day for a little bit of doubts?” Continue reading

Advertisements

Wearing my hijaab: Understanding, appreciation, action

28 Sep

Wearing the hijab for me was a choice and an eventual process rather than a sudden change. Like many young Muslim women, hijab can be very challenging to take on at first. The first thing that would go through one’s mind would be: “How will I be perceived? What would people say? What would people think?” Then followed closely, with something like: “Am I ready for the hijab? It’s a big commitment. Is it even necessary?” A couple more thoughts would perhaps follow, accompanied essentially with doubts, minuscule fears, apprehensions and confusion. Continue reading

Why I Wear Hijab

31 May

The Hijab, which is basically a cloth that covers the body except the face, hands and feet, is worn by the majority of Muslim women across the globe as a symbol of piety, modesty, as a representation of their Faith and above all, as obedience to God. Furthermore, the level of covering varies from country to country and from Muslim woman to Muslim woman. With a simple analysis, one can see that the level of veiling varies from country to country. I personally believe this difference lies in the various environments, level of religiosity, social status and culture Muslim women live in.

Continue reading

Wearing My Hijaab: Understanding, Appreciation, Action

31 May

Wearing the hijab for me was a choice and an eventual process rather than a sudden change. Like many young Muslim women, hijab can be very challenging to take on at first. The first thing that would go through one’s mind would be: “How will I be perceived? What would people say? What would people think?” Then followed closely  with something like: “Am I ready for the hijab? It’s a big commitment. Is it even necessary?” A couple more thoughts would perhaps follow, accompanied essentially with doubts, minuscule fears, apprehensions and confusion.

Continue reading

‘I have covered my head, not my brain’

28 Oct

I don’t have an exciting story to tell, in fact, it’s probably the simplest and most cliché filled one you will read, but alas, it’s my journey to the Hijab and my understanding of it.

Like most second generation British Pakistani’s, culture had a heavy influence in my life as I was growing up, I would say probably more so than Islam.  Alhamdulillah (all Praise due to Allah) though, as me and my siblings grew up things changed.  We weren’t the type of family who would pray together; in fact when we were younger my father worked such long hours that apart from Ramadhan and Jummah I can’t remember seeing him pray.  We prayed our prayers at the local Masjid, which we attended after school. Continue reading

My Red Hijab by Guest Contributor Iman Gill

25 Sep

My name is Iman Gill and I have been blessed to practice Islam for over a decade. I am African-American and in my late twenties. I was introduced to Islam through a wonderful Muslim Community in a suburb of Atlanta, where there is a large African-American Muslim population. This community had all types of Muslims, some who had practiced Islam all of their lives and some who had converted. It was like another world, full of beautiful Sisters in hijab and Brothers with beards and jalabias. They were so warm, accepting, and overly friendly. The amount of respect these women received in their community is what gave me the courage to ditch my tight jeans and french roll and embrace the world of modesty and wear the hijab proudly.  Continue reading

The Camel’s Hump

19 Sep

Surah An-Nur, Verses 30 and 31 clearly states:

‘And Say to the believing women to lower their gaze (from looking at forbidden things), and protect their private parts (from illegal sexual acts) and not to show off their adornment except only that which is apparent (like both eyes for necessity to see the way, or outer palms of hands or one eye or dress like veil, gloves, head-cover, apron), and to draw their veils all over Juyubihinna (i.e. their bodies, faces, necks and bossoms) and not to reveal their adornment except to their husbands, or their fathers, or their husband’s fathers, or their sons, or their husband’s sons, or their brothers or their brother’s sons, or their sister’s sons, or their (Muslim women) (i.e. sisters in Islam), or the (female) slaves whom their right hands possess, or old male servants who lack vigour, or small children who have no sense of feminine sex. And let them not stamp their feet so as to reveal what they hide of their adornment. And all of you beg Allah to forgive you all, O believers, that you may be successful’ Continue reading

A Lollipop Unwrapped.

8 Sep

(Originally written for and published on the blog One Chinese Muslimah)

‘And Say to the believing women to lower their gaze (from looking at forbidden things), and protect their private parts (from illegal sexual acts) and not to show off their adornment except only that which is apparent (like both eyes for necessity to see the way, or outer palms of hands or one eye or dress like veil, gloves, head-cover, apron), and to draw their veils all over Juyubihinna (i.e. their bodies, faces, necks and bossoms) and not to reveal their adornment except to their husbands, or their fathers, or their husband’s fathers, or their sons, or their husband’s sons, or their brothers or their brother’s sons, or their sister’s sons, or their (Muslim women) (i.e. sisters in Islam), or the (female) slaves whom their right hands possess, or old male servants who lack vigour, or small children who have no sense of feminine sex. And let them not stamp their feet so as to reveal what they hide of their adornment. And all of you beg Allah to forgive you all, O believers, that you may be successful’ (24:31)
My first hijab experience went something like this. After I became Muslim, I gave myself a time frame, I was planning on sporting the hijab when I was “ready” and I had planned for it to be a month after I became Muslim. But of course, Allah is the Best of Planners and He knows best. I actually started wearing the hijab a week and a half after I became Muslim! Continue reading

My Hijaab Journey

20 Aug

Alhamdulillah, I was born a Muslim. I observe the five pillars of Islam, I generally stay away from haraam (e.g I don’t drink, eat pork etc)…and so on. However, I have not always been a Hijabi. So… introductions aside, I think I can now take you on my Hijaab journey.

Continue reading

My hijab. My right.

5 Aug

(Originally written for and published on the blog One Love Hijabi)

Salam 

I thought I’d share my hijab story.  It isn’t as inspirational and interesting as other hijab stories, but for me it’s perfect.
I’m blessed enough to be born a Muslim, and into a practising family. Continue reading

Hijaab Journey

3 Aug

Dear Reader,

It is coming close to the month of Ramadan, and to the start of my Hijaab journey. God willing I will be wearing the hijaab from the first day of Ramadan and from then on. I have had a mixture of emotions, but one feeling that has been stronger than the rest is faith. I have strong faith in my decision to wear the hijaab, and no opinion or facial expression can render it. I may feel strange, but I hope my decision inspires a million others, as it can only be the right way if Islam states so.

What I wanted to write about, was what the hijaab meant to me, and I will do this through a poem. Continue reading

My hijab story

26 Jul

Bismillahir Rahmanir Raheem (In the Name of Allah the Beneficent, the merciful)

Asalamu Alaikum (Peace be upon you) everyone.

I really don’t know where to begin with my hijab story so I’m just going to start.

Continue reading

My Journey

4 Jul

Bismillah Rahmanir Rahim [ In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful]
I remember when I started wearing the hijab, just over a year ago, during Ramadhan. As this years Ramadhan approaches, it makes me excited to renew my commitment.

Continue reading

Restraint? Sure. Oppression? Hardly. By Leila Aboulela (published in The Washington Post)

25 Jun

Click here for the original article on The Washington Post website

 

 

Restraint? Sure. Oppression? Hardly.

By Leila Aboulela

Sunday, July 22, 2007

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates

The West believes that Islam oppresses women. But as a Muslim, descended from generations of Muslims, I have a different story to tell. It starts like this: You say, “The sea is salty.” I say, “But it is blue and full of fish.” I am not objective about Islam, and although I am considerably Westernized, I can never truly see it through Western eyes. I am in this religion. It is in me. And articulating the intimacy of faith and the experience of worship to a Western audience is a challenge and a discovery.

Continue reading

My Hijaab Journey

23 Jun

Dear Reader,

Throughout my life I have been faced with choices, options and routes. Unfortunately, more so than not, I have chosen to take a route directing me away from Islam and taking options that have left me emotionally drained and spiritually lost. Alhamdullilah we live and we learn, I am proud to say that eventually I have found a place were I am settled and feel at ease for the first time in my life since I started to make my own decisions. This is my journey to the hijaab, and I want to share it with you all.

 

Continue reading

The Beauty of Niqab

21 Jun

Bismillah Ar-Rahman Ar-Raheem
As-Salaamu ‘Alaykum or as I say to my Somalis, As-salama Calaikum.
 
I have a secret. I wear the niqab (face cover). It’s a progression of my hijab journey, not a digression from it, or an exaggeration of the Islamic principle of haya (modesty).  I have encountered numerous sisters who foster a desire to wear the niqab, but who don’t know where to start. As this is a blog supporting the mujahabah (women who cover Islamically), I felt pressed to explain what drove me to begin wearing the niqab. 
Continue reading

Once Upon A Time…

20 Jun

Bismillah Ar-Rahman Ar-Raheem,

As-salaamu ‘Alaykum! After much difficulty, I can finally write my tale of coming to wear the hijab! I’ve thought long and hard about whether to give the shortened version or the detailed one. So, detailed it is!

When I chose to practice Islam, I was not a big fan of the dress code. Most people have this religious zeal about themselves when they first come to know a religion, when they begin to practice it. For me, I was just happy to have the label, Muslim, you know?

Continue reading

Me and My Hijaab

19 Jun

In the Name of the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful.

As-salaamu-alikum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatu

Peace,

I hope this post finds you in good health insha’Allah. Let me tell you a bit about myself.

I was born a Muslim and grew up in a Muslim household. I knew the basics, pray five times a day and basic prayers, they were always relayed to me as important and I knew they were. As a child I always had an interest in Islam, I still remember when I was learning how to pray Salah (compulsory prayer) with my mum, it’s a memory I hold closely. As I grew up my dad took us to Arabic school, I learnt the alphabet and before I left I could basically read in Arabic. I was proud of myself and I took a big interest in Arabic. I thought and still think that it is such a beautiful language from the letters to the pronunciations, but after I left, it all left me as well. I grew up in a very western area there were no other Asians let alone Muslims, so I grew up very westernised- but had a Muslim streak in me.

Continue reading

I call my Hijab a blessing

18 Jun

Asalaamalaikum (Peace be upon you)

When a sister asked me to blog about my experiences with hijab, my immediate reaction was ‘what am I going to write about? I don’t have an amazing life changing story that people love to read about’. I have been following Islamic blogs and hijab stories and websites for a few years now and I absolutely love them. They are refreshing, pure, honest and inspirational. I then thought, these stories are amazing SubhanAllah (Glory be to God), but not everyone has an amazing story. Some sisters struggle so I’m going to be very honest in my experience.

Continue reading

My Complete Journey to Hijab

14 Jun

Bismillahir’ Rahman ir’ Rahim

(Before I start I just want to say I’m not very good with talking about myself, but I will try my best.)

Growing up, hijab was something I thought I would have to wear when I got older. I started secondary school, and my Mum said I should start covering my hair as it was compulsary in Islam. To me that wasn’t an good enough reason, I always remember asking myself, “surely there’s got to be a much more profound significance as to why women wear hijab.” I just never knew how essential it was.

Continue reading

Hijab

11 Jun

Since the age of 12, Hijab was a major part of my life. Some days, I didn’t mind it – but other days, it was an issue for me. Like most teenage girls, I wanted to be fashionable, stylish and wear whatever I wanted. The Hijab did not work in my favour. In truth, I sometimes felt restricted. But then again, I was a child who could not yet fully understand the benefits of the veil.

Continue reading

My Hijab, My Legacy, My Son, My Life

7 Jun

My Hijab and My Son

        In 2006, I became Muslim.  As sat inside a T.G.I.F restaurant with my husband, I began to cry about wearing hijab. I thought “I do not dress provocatively, so why is hijab necessary.” My dear husband told me that my wearing hijab was between myself and Allaah azza wa jall. He told me that he would support me and make du’a for Allaah ta ala’ to soften my heart to hijab. For the next year, I wore hijab on and off (mostly off), and people noticed my wavering. The people were not mean, smart, or any other negative attribute, but their ability to notice my struggle made me question “how long will I waver in this?”

Liberated Woman

6 Jun

I am a liberated woman,

I chose it,

It did not choose me,

Nobody forced it,

Continue reading

Me and My Hijab

6 Jun

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

 (In the name of Allah, the Beneficient, the Merciful)

My relationship with hijab has been a particularly temperamental one but I wouldn’t want it any other way.  Alhumdulillah (praise be to the Almighty) I was born into a Muslim family.  However, I personally disagree with the idea of following the religion of one’s forefathers without any independent study.  I have always been a ponderer from ever since I can remember.  The concept of religion for me is a fascinating one.  I have forever been curious about my purpose in this world and always seem to have an extensive list of questions ready to ask my learned friends.

Continue reading

The Beginning.

3 Jun

Bismillahir Rahmanir Raheem

(In the Name of Allah, the Beneficient, the Merciful)

I was 16, and on one of my many “extracurricular excursions” from school. That is to say, I was truanting/wagging/jigging. Again. On this particular occasion, it was a Friday, and I decided it would be far more productive for me to attend jumuah (Friday) prayer than my English class. I had never attended Jumuah (Friday prayers) at a proper masjid before. I was with a friend who wore hijab. She had a spare with her, so I put it on and we were set to enter the mosque.

Continue reading

Liberated.

2 Jun

I put on my hijab nearly 5 years ago, when I was 20.  This drastic decision immediately changed who I was and what I looked like.  From being an image conscious, outspoken, trendy girl, to a woman who had become more concerned about faith and modesty.  This, I believed, really shocked those who knew me.  “Did you get married?” one friend at university asked me when she saw me in my hijab and abaya (gown). I replied “No.”.  And this was true. I wasn’t pushed into it by a man or anyone else for that matter.  It was completely the opposite.  Instead of being forced, I was inspired, firstly by God, and then by other young people who were taking the same steps forward as me: they were coming back to Islam.

Continue reading

Hijab.

2 Jun

Asalaamu Alaykum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatu 🙂

Ahhhh Hijab Hijab Hijab. How you stressed my soul lol.  I FINALLY made the decision to wear the Hijab at 19 about half way into my first year at University.  That’s the finishing line, my journey to that point spans over 6 years :O.  Here I Go…

Continue reading

Me and My Hijab – The Beginning

2 Jun

Being born into a Muslim family doesn’t always mean you will be the best Muslim in your class and for me, to some extent that was true a lot of the time. Culture plays a huge part in the life of a Pakistani- Kashmiri child’s life, or in fact every one, young or old, that’s just the way that it is. I think for me, there was always a huge imbalance between my culture and religion and there was never a line drawn between the two. So naturally my journey began when I began drawing the lines.

Continue reading

Hijab Anniversary!

31 May

Today is my hijab anniversary. A year ago I made the decision to wear the hijab. Hmm the decision wasn’t entirely mine – keep reading. After recently traveling to war torn Somalia where I was forced to wear it – as in “you better put the hijab on in Dubai before you reach Somalia or you’ll be beat!”. Well, I wouldn’t say forced but the action was heavily influenced by mother. I couldn’t stop thinking about my mother’s words as I boarded the flight from Amsterdam to Dubai. Experienced a little bit of a culture shock – I’ve never seen so many covered people in my life! There I was with my funky curly hair and a scarf wrapped around my neck – I like to call modest chic. So, I march into the washroom and threw on an abaya (the long Islamic dress) and the hijab. Feeling a little awkward, I put on a little more make-up and glossy red lipgloss. The message: I’m a Western Muslim woman.

Continue reading

My Religion, My Hijab, My Choice

31 May

I still remember it like it was yesterday. My mother was dropping me off at school that day. My hand trembled as I grabbed my book bag and bolted from the car. Today was going to be monumental. At least in my eyes it would be.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: